Portable Extinguishers

Posted by on Feb 7, 2016 in Blog, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Portable Extinguishers

According to NFPA #10, portable extinguishers must be inspected and tagged on an annual basis. Every 6 years, stored-pressure fire extinguishers must be subjected to a full internal inspection. This procedure includes removing and replacing the fire-extinguishing agent as well as the valve assembly to ensure the seal remains closed. Hydrostatic Testing Hydrostatic testing (pressure tested using water or some other non-compressible fluid to help prevent unwanted failure or rupture of the cylinder) is required in regular intervals on all extinguishers.  These intervals vary depending on the type of extinguisher.  See below for specific testing requirements: Extinguisher Type Test Interval (Years) Stored-pressure water, water mist, loaded stream, and/or antifreeze 5 Wetting agent 5 AFFF (Aqueous Film-Forming Foam) 5 FFFP (Film-Forming Fluoroprotein Foam) 5 Dry chemical with stainless steel shells 5 Carbon Dioxide 5 Wet Chemical 5 Dry chemical, stored-pressure, with mild steel, brazed brass or aluminum shells 12 Dry chemical, cartridge or cylinder operated with mild steel shells 12 Dry powder, stored-pressure, cartridge or cylinder operated, with mild steel shells 12 **All repair work and hydrostatic testing is done in our DOT certified maintenance shop by Certified employees. ABCO Fire & Safety Inc. is pleased to offer the following services: Annual Automatic Service Plan – ABCO Fire & Safety Inc. will automatically schedule your annual fire extinguisher inspection well in advance of the expiration date Fire extinguisher surveys at no additional charge Mobile recharge capability Guaranteed Next Day Service for empty fire extinguishers Our shop staff can repair large capacity industrial wheeled fire...

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How Do You Perform a Monthly Fire Extinguisher Inspection?

Posted by on Jan 30, 2016 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

How Do You Perform a Monthly Fire Extinguisher Inspection? Fire extinguisher guidelines require that you have your equipment professionally inspected, tested, and tagged annually. But since fire extinguishers are designed to be a quick-response means of defending your building against fires, they need to be able to work at a moment’s notice all year long! In addition to annual professional inspections, here are some things you can look at on your own each month to make sure your extinguishers will work when you need them to: Monthly Fire Extinguisher Inspections                        Ensure fire extinguishers are located in their proper places – you should have dedicated areas of your building where fire extinguishers are clearly visible and easily accessible. Make sure everyone in your building knows where these location are. Inspect for obvious physical damage – important things to look for include the safety pin and tamper seal, signs of corrosion or leakage, clogs in the nozzle, and cracks or dents in the extinguisher shell. Check the pressure gauge – make sure the needle on the pressure gauge is in the green zone to indicate adequate pressure, but even if it is, lift the fire alarm to make sure it feels heavy enough – these two steps combined are the best way to ensure your extinguisher is ready to be used. Point the operating instructions outward – the operating instructions and extinguisher nameplate must be legible and clearly visible at all times. Check the date tag – if it is approaching a full year since your last professional fire extinguisher inspection, call a fire protection services company to set up an inspection. If the tag is missing or damaged, cal right away. Initial and date the back of the tag – this will indicate that you performed the required inspection. Remember that monthly fire extinguisher inspections, while important, are not a substitute for professional maintenance. If it has been more than 12 months since the date on your fire extinguisher tag and you are looking for Fire extinguisher Inspection in Tampa ,St.Petersburg,Clearwater or Pinellas, call  ABCO Fire & Safety...

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What is a Class D Fire Extinguisher

Posted by on Jan 27, 2016 in Featured, Uncategorized | Comments Off on What is a Class D Fire Extinguisher

What is a Class D Fire Extinguisher

What is a Class D Fire Extinguisher? Class D fire extinguishers are used to put out large combustible metal fires, such as a magnesium, lithium, or lithium alloy fires. They are available with two different types of extinguishing agents, a copper powder or a sodium chloride. The copper powder Class D fire extinguishers are mainly for combustible metal fires that contain lithium, or lithium alloys. A good example would be an area that contains lithium batteries. The less expensive sodium chloride can be used for fires that contain magnesium, sodium, potassium and sodium-potassium alloys. These Class D fire extinguishers are yellow and weigh almost 60 pounds with the chemical weighing in at 30 pounds. It has a soft-flow nozzle extension applicator that shoots out the side instead of a direct shot. Many times a company will place these extinguishers on a wheel cart in order to easily move them around if necessary. This Class D fire extinguisher is recommended for machine shops where they are machining magnesium or alloys. Always be sure you always research the type of fire extinguisher that is required for your place of business. If you are unsure, give ABCO Fire & Safety Inc, a call and they will be happy to help you. Contact...

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Purple-K

Posted by on Jan 10, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Purple-K

Purple-K, also known as PKP, is a dry-chemical fire suppression agent used in some dry chemical fire extinguishers. It is the second most effective dry chemical in fighting class B (flammable liquid) fires after Monnex (potassium allophanate), and can be used against some energized electrical equipment fires (USA class C fires). It has about 4–5 times more effectiveness against class B fires than carbon dioxide, and more than twice that of sodium bicarbonate. Some fire extinguishers are capable of operation in temperatures down to −54 °C or up to +49 °C. Dry chemical works by directly inhibiting the chemical chain reaction which forms one of the four sides of the fire tetrahedron (Heat + Oxygen + Fuel + Chemical Chain Reaction = Fire). To a much smaller degree it also has a smothering effect —by excluding oxygen from the fire. “Dry chemical” extinguishers, such as Purple-K, are different from “dry powder” extinguishers that are used to fight Class D flammable metal fires. Purple-K powder has an acrid taste and odor, is free-flowing, floating on most liquids, non-abrasive, does not wet with water and is compatible with most foam concentrates. It has violet color, to distinguish it from other dry agents. Its principal component is potassium bicarbonate (78–82% by weight), with addition of sodium bicarbonate (12–15%), mica (1–3%), Fuller’s earth (1–3%), amorphous silica (0.2–%), and is made hydrophobic by methyl hydrogen polysiloxane (0.2–1%). Purple-K is normally non-toxic, but ingestion of large amount can cause alkalosis. In high temperatures it decomposes to carbon dioxide and potassium oxide, which is toxic and highly...

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